#Follow Any Day

More and more people are getting on board the Twitter train.  One thing that I hear from  people who are either new to Twitter or aren’t sure about it – who do I follow?  A trend that got started is the perfect solution to the answer and it’s known as FollowFriday.   Every Friday you are encouraged to suggest to your Tweeps who you consider follow worthy.  I love this idea and have contributed to it each and every Friday since I’ve learned about it.  Only flaw I’ve seen is there was no real way to know why I should follow one person vs. another.  When I’ve tweeted my #followfriday recommendations I’ve always tried to include what these people have in common.  So in other words I categorized my Tweeps (gee, I do work in a library you know – sorry no Dewey decimal or LOC subject headings just basic tagging here).

My list of who I am following is growing.  I have lots of different groups (library folks, Linux people, business, news, etc).  So I decided to break down my groups and list them here on my blog then you can follow these fine folks any day of the week.  Listed in order as they appear in my Twitter account.

Libraries, Library people and trainers to follow:

yalescilib / YaleScienceLibraries

HCLDayintheLife / HowardCo Lib Staff

HiRecommended/HCL Highly Recommended

geekegrrl / Sarah

Auger / Brian Auger

beccalovesbooks / Becca Johnson

weelibrarian / Krista Godfrey

vargasruth / Ruth Vargas

dbouman / Danny Bouman

jdelagardelle / Jody Delagardelle

typealibrarian / Jennifer Hrusch

glenhorton / Glen Horton

chattylibrarian / Joan

CanuckLibrarian / Jennifer C

FrontierLibrary / Sarah Baldwin

kgs / K.G. Schneider

SBULibrary / Stony Brook Library

Kaess / Katrin Kropf

libraryfuture / Joe Murphy

cdm014

Lee_Martin

skiddjohnson / Suzanne Kidd Johnson

LibraryGuy / Craig Anderson

infowidget / Amy Harmon

Jill_HW / Jill Hurst-Wahl

cclibrarian / JMS

library_chan / Melissa Houlroyd

billcompugeek / Bill

Sara_Mooney / Sara Mooney

jaimebc / jaime corris hammond

sclapp / Sharon Clapp

lagina

jenother / Jen Spisak

pollyalida / polly

gspadoni / Gina Spadoni

hbraum / Heather Braum

calimae / Cindy Bowen

ashlieconway / Ashlie Conway

Slzimm1 / Stephanie Zimmerman

LorreS / Lorre Smith

griffey / Jason Griffey

walkingpaper / aaron schmidt

awd / Aaron W. Dobbs

cindi

librarysteve

rtennant / Roy Tennant

stevelawson / Steve Lawson

ZenLibrarian / Annette Jones

infosciphi / Chadwick Seagraves

bckhough / Brenda Hough

aarontay

ALA_LITA

ellbeecee / Laura

ashuping / Andrew Shuping

caro6302 / Caroline Ramsden

james3neal / James Neal

webmaster_ref / Brent Ferguson

librarygary

libkitty / Freya Anderson

WebJunction

brewinlibrarian / Matt Hamilton

erindowney

lorireed

hblowers / Helene

librarianmer / Meredith

libraryman / Michael Porter

akearns / Amy Kearns

askusnow / Maryland AskUsNow!

s_francoeur / Stephen Francoeur

LibraryJournal / Library Journal

talkingbooks / Talking Books

tisfortraining

joshuamneff / Joshua M. Neff

MLx / Marianne Lenox

librarianbyday / Bobbi Newman

crankylibrarian / Kaia

tattp / Valerie Beyers

LibraryChica / Stacey Aldrich

shifted / Jenny Levine

RyanDeschamps / Ryan Deschamps

victoriaptersen / Victoria Petersen

library_chic / Courtney S.

pfanderson / P. F. Anderson

cjburns / Christa Burns

gregschwartz / Greg Schwartz

conniecrosby / Connie Crosby

strnglibrarian / Julie Strange

rachelrapp / Rachel Rappaport

TheLiB / Sarah Houghton-Jan

mbreeding / Marshall Breeding

mstephens7 / Michael Stephens

adegroff

jessamyn / jessamyn west

msauers / Michael Sauers

baldgeekinmd / MC aka baldgeekinmd

Web 2.0 or Social Media/Networking:

hootsuite / HootSuite

Topify

FirstDigg / FirstDigg / Urgo

TwitZap

adamostrow / Adam Ostrow

Gripwire / Brett Polonsky

mattsingley / matt singley

bobrobboy / Bob Robertson-Boyd

rww / Richard MacManus

socialmedian / Jason Goldberg

ashleylomas / Ashley Lomas

TheNextWeb / The Next Web

kanter / Beth Kanter

adamhirsch / Adam Hirsch

digitalnatives / Digital Natives

jowyang / Jeremiah Owyang

mashable / Pete Cashmore

SocialMedia411 / Social Media Insider

socialmention

slqotd / SLQOTD

TiffanyStrobel / Tiffany Strobel

socialmediaclub / Social Media Club

Open Source related :

ranginui / Chris Cormack- Koha

joetho / Joe Tho- Koha

wizzyrea / Liz Rea- Koha

Miromurr / Thomas Brevik- Koha

gmcharlt / Galen – Koha

magnusenger – Koha

corephp / ‘corePHP’

nirak / Karin Dalziel- Linux

LinuxVoices

galaxiecruzin / Alex B- Linux

nengard / Nicole Engard – Koha

linuxjournal

Linux

Companies or  Web Sites:

momentile / Momentile

wefollow

engadget / Engadget

google / A Googler

Twitter_Tips / Tips, Tools, Status

facebook / Facebook

nytimes / The New York Times

TwistenFM / Twisten.FM

WebReference

firefox / Firefox

BreakingNewz / Breaking News

Grooveshark

TalkShoe

wordpress / WordPress

BreakingNews / BNO News

google_us_news / Google News US

bbctech / BBC Technology

cnnbrk / CNN Breaking News

Discovery and Delivery

This phrase has been bantered about a lot over the last several months at MPOW (always thought that should be MPOE – employment- but far be it from me to break from Internet tradition).  It got me thinking – is that what we really do at the library?  It certainly isn’t the only thing we do (our classes [or programs] as well as outreach via our booktalks, etc are very important) but it is a great deal of what we do.

Does it matter whether we discover an answer from a reference book, database, or web site?   Does it matter whether we deliver that “must watch now” DVD into the hands of an anixous customer, recommend a great fiction book, or find the last copy of “Romeo and Juliet” for a last minute high school student?  More importantly should it?

If the job of a library boils down to discovering things for customers and delivering it to them why should it matter how we discover it or what we deliver?  To me it shouldn’t.  So if we say that it doesn’t matter where we get the answer (assuming that whatever the source is it is reliable) and it doesn’t matter what type of material we delivery to the customer – should it matter how the request for discovery or delivery reaches us?

For some staff it does seem to matter.  In this day and age why would a phone call be seen as having more value than an IM or a hold request through the catalog?  A request is a request no matter what form it takes.  Are they not all ways our customers are asking us to discover and deliver something to them?  What makes you busier – 20 phone calls or a pull list of 150-200 items?  If you have a holds pull lists that ranges 150-200 items why can’t you see that as 150-200 customers asking for help?  If I IM you is that better or worse than a phone call?

What if I walk into your library and ask for “Of Mice and Men” is my request of more value (therefore given more attention) than a request for “Dumb and Dumber” on DVD?  If you asked some staff they might not admit it but they certainly give weight to book type requests vs. audio-visual type requests.  Content is content – it shouldn’t matter what the packaging looks like.  Remember the old adage don’t judge a book by it’s cover….. well it’s about time it’s been updated.   Don’t judge content by it’s packaging.

Worth a Thousand Words

So they say is the definition of a picture. Recently on FriendFeed, Tad started another meme. This time it wasn’t about what you’d like the future generations to know or how you got started in libraryland but something equally interesting – Take a picture right now. No, you can’t fix your hair or freshen your makeup or straighten your bow tie. Just do it (as Nike says).

It was interesting to see the pictures of friends I either knew virtually or in reality. Some were real surprises – like almostbaldgeekinmd, I’ve only seen him in casual wear so it was great to see him in a tie and jacket. At least 6 librarians had some collection of books in the background of their photos, go figure! My favorite backgrounds were the ones taken at work. Fun to zoom in and see what toys, tshatshks and papers could give me some insight into these folks I call friends.

Only problem is there doesn’t seem to be one location where all the photos can be seen together. Perhaps I can convince folks to leave links to their photos in the comments section here.

I’ll start:

Instructions: Take a picture of yourself right now. Don’t change your clothes, don’t fix your hair – just take a picture. Post that picture with NO editing. Post these instructions with the picture.

T is for Training

I had the honor of participated in a niche that was finally filled today. To paraphrase what baldgeekinmd said “if you see something missing on the web you fill it – that is part of the read/write web”. Maurice was inspired by Greg Schwartz’s Uncontrolled Vocabulary show. And after searching around the podcasts out there realized there wasn’t anything that addressed training especially in the library world. So hence T is for Training was born.

Today was the “dress rehearsal” for the show. I joined Maurice, Jennifer Ranck (Training Coordinator for Eastern Shore Regional Libraries), and Bobbi Newman Digital Services Librarian at the Missouri River Regional Library.

I expected to be just a causal testing of the software (TalkShoe) but Maurice dived right in and had an agenda setup and the topics were quite interesting. Everything from do librarians need survival training to Bobbi’s 2.1 program to general talk about the aftermath of 23 Things here in MD (once Bobbi left the room was full of just MD trainers so we slanted the topic to us) and even a small trainer vent session. I suggested that Maurice keep the last 3 minutes of the show for the trainer vent session (will save a lot on our therapy bills).

I’m excited about this show and hope that lots of other trainers (library related or not) will join us on September 12 at 10:00 am for the first show and all the others to come.

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