T is for Training Meme

Our illustrious leader, Maurice Coleman aka baldgeekinmd, challenged the cast of regulars on the podcast T is for Training to answer these 27 questions.  We had to limit our answers to one sentence.  So here are the questions with my answers bolded.

1.) Your One Sentence Bio

Coordinator Software Support and Training for Howard County Library, social web aficionado, budding photographer.

2.) Do you blog? If yes, how did you come up with your blog name?

Yes.  A variation on the name of my blog from Maryland’s 23 Things.

3.) What is your professional background?

Jacquelynn of all trades, mistress of some regarding work in the library (Circ[past], ILL [past], IT and training [current]).

4.) What training do you do? staff? patrons? types of classes?

Yes, yes and technology/social web based classes for both.

5.) What training do you think is most important to libraries right now

Technology based training – anything from social web to word processing to apps for mobile phones.

6.) Where do you get your training?

Pick it up where I can.

7.) How do you keep up?

TisforTraining podcast, Twitter (trainers group), blogs and RSS feeds – especially from the cast of regulars (they rock)!

8.) What do you think are the biggest challenges libraries are facing right now?

Funding and getting the respect they deserve as part of the education process within the community.

9.) What are biggest challenges for trainers?

The students, seriously you can teach almost anything but if the person is resistant….well.

10.) What exciting things are you doing training wise?

Nothing really other than using Jeopardy as a way to access if the class got it – they have fun and so do I.

11.) What do you wish were you doing?

List is too long to put here.

12.) What would you do with a badger?

Release it to the wild or give it to a wildlife sanctuary.

13.) What’s your favorite food?

Food!  Literally I love all kinds and they are my favs (but big on carbs and sweets unfortunately).

14.) If you were stranded on an island, what one thing would you want to have with you?

My cell phone because it would keep me connected to the world (assuming that I’d have coverage there).

15.)  Do you know what happens when a grasshopper kicks all the seeds out of a pickle?

Umm, it curls up inside and goes to sleep???

16.) Post it notes or the back of your hand?

Big Post-It note fan here.

17.) Windows or Mac?

LINUX!

18.) Talk about one training moment you’d like to forget?

My Twitter class for the public when within 10 mins of starting 2 people left which rattled me for the rest of the class.

19.) What’s your take on handshakes?

Firm has to be firm because wimpy just doesn’t do.

20.) Global warming: yes or no

Sadly, yes although if you judge by this winter you wouldn’t know it.

21.) How did you get into this line of work?

See blog post for how I got started in library biz – I feel into the role of training and discovered was good at it and people enjoyed/learned from my classes.

22.) Why is the best part of your job?

That I honestly learn something new every day!

23.) Why should someone else follow in your shoes?

Because they love to help people, love that ah-ha moment and love to learn themselves.

24.) Sushi or hamburger?

Sushi, definitely.

25.) LSW or ALA?

LSW without a doubt.

26.) What one person in the world do you want to have lunch with and why?

Hmm, would have to be some of the brains that work at Google because they are innovative and rate a high cool factor ;)

27.) What cell phone do you have and why?

MyTouch 3G (running on open source Android OS) because I love to stay connected and informed.

My fellow T is for Training folks and their answers to the questions:

Nicole Engard – The T is for Training Challenge

Polly-Alida Farrington – The T is for Training Challenge

Bobbi Newman – T is for Training Meme

Alison Miller – A T is for Training Challenge

Maurice Coleman’s Getting to Know All About Me Post

Betha Getsche - I Like Sushi & Libraries

Laura Botts – “C is for Challenge” at “T is for Training”

Heather Braum – T is for Training Challenge Meme

Jill Hurst-Wahl – Me. Coffee. Morning.

Pete Bromberg’s 23 things (minus 3): A getting to know ya post

Stephanie Zimmerman – A Get to Know Me Meme from TIFT

Marianne Lenox – 27 Questions (Supplemental Pictorial Essay)

Paul Signorelli – Paul’s Getting to Know Me Post

Lauren Pressley – 23 Questions with Lauren Pressley

Buffy Hamilton – 27 Questions with Buffy Hamilton

Jay Turner – 20 Questions for Just that Guy

Julie Strange – T is for Training Questionapalooza v 1.1

Angela Paterek – Getting to Know Me

#Follow Any Day

More and more people are getting on board the Twitter train.  One thing that I hear from  people who are either new to Twitter or aren’t sure about it – who do I follow?  A trend that got started is the perfect solution to the answer and it’s known as FollowFriday.   Every Friday you are encouraged to suggest to your Tweeps who you consider follow worthy.  I love this idea and have contributed to it each and every Friday since I’ve learned about it.  Only flaw I’ve seen is there was no real way to know why I should follow one person vs. another.  When I’ve tweeted my #followfriday recommendations I’ve always tried to include what these people have in common.  So in other words I categorized my Tweeps (gee, I do work in a library you know – sorry no Dewey decimal or LOC subject headings just basic tagging here).

My list of who I am following is growing.  I have lots of different groups (library folks, Linux people, business, news, etc).  So I decided to break down my groups and list them here on my blog then you can follow these fine folks any day of the week.  Listed in order as they appear in my Twitter account.

Libraries, Library people and trainers to follow:

yalescilib / YaleScienceLibraries

HCLDayintheLife / HowardCo Lib Staff

HiRecommended/HCL Highly Recommended

geekegrrl / Sarah

Auger / Brian Auger

beccalovesbooks / Becca Johnson

weelibrarian / Krista Godfrey

vargasruth / Ruth Vargas

dbouman / Danny Bouman

jdelagardelle / Jody Delagardelle

typealibrarian / Jennifer Hrusch

glenhorton / Glen Horton

chattylibrarian / Joan

CanuckLibrarian / Jennifer C

FrontierLibrary / Sarah Baldwin

kgs / K.G. Schneider

SBULibrary / Stony Brook Library

Kaess / Katrin Kropf

libraryfuture / Joe Murphy

cdm014

Lee_Martin

skiddjohnson / Suzanne Kidd Johnson

LibraryGuy / Craig Anderson

infowidget / Amy Harmon

Jill_HW / Jill Hurst-Wahl

cclibrarian / JMS

library_chan / Melissa Houlroyd

billcompugeek / Bill

Sara_Mooney / Sara Mooney

jaimebc / jaime corris hammond

sclapp / Sharon Clapp

lagina

jenother / Jen Spisak

pollyalida / polly

gspadoni / Gina Spadoni

hbraum / Heather Braum

calimae / Cindy Bowen

ashlieconway / Ashlie Conway

Slzimm1 / Stephanie Zimmerman

LorreS / Lorre Smith

griffey / Jason Griffey

walkingpaper / aaron schmidt

awd / Aaron W. Dobbs

cindi

librarysteve

rtennant / Roy Tennant

stevelawson / Steve Lawson

ZenLibrarian / Annette Jones

infosciphi / Chadwick Seagraves

bckhough / Brenda Hough

aarontay

ALA_LITA

ellbeecee / Laura

ashuping / Andrew Shuping

caro6302 / Caroline Ramsden

james3neal / James Neal

webmaster_ref / Brent Ferguson

librarygary

libkitty / Freya Anderson

WebJunction

brewinlibrarian / Matt Hamilton

erindowney

lorireed

hblowers / Helene

librarianmer / Meredith

libraryman / Michael Porter

akearns / Amy Kearns

askusnow / Maryland AskUsNow!

s_francoeur / Stephen Francoeur

LibraryJournal / Library Journal

talkingbooks / Talking Books

tisfortraining

joshuamneff / Joshua M. Neff

MLx / Marianne Lenox

librarianbyday / Bobbi Newman

crankylibrarian / Kaia

tattp / Valerie Beyers

LibraryChica / Stacey Aldrich

shifted / Jenny Levine

RyanDeschamps / Ryan Deschamps

victoriaptersen / Victoria Petersen

library_chic / Courtney S.

pfanderson / P. F. Anderson

cjburns / Christa Burns

gregschwartz / Greg Schwartz

conniecrosby / Connie Crosby

strnglibrarian / Julie Strange

rachelrapp / Rachel Rappaport

TheLiB / Sarah Houghton-Jan

mbreeding / Marshall Breeding

mstephens7 / Michael Stephens

adegroff

jessamyn / jessamyn west

msauers / Michael Sauers

baldgeekinmd / MC aka baldgeekinmd

Web 2.0 or Social Media/Networking:

hootsuite / HootSuite

Topify

FirstDigg / FirstDigg / Urgo

TwitZap

adamostrow / Adam Ostrow

Gripwire / Brett Polonsky

mattsingley / matt singley

bobrobboy / Bob Robertson-Boyd

rww / Richard MacManus

socialmedian / Jason Goldberg

ashleylomas / Ashley Lomas

TheNextWeb / The Next Web

kanter / Beth Kanter

adamhirsch / Adam Hirsch

digitalnatives / Digital Natives

jowyang / Jeremiah Owyang

mashable / Pete Cashmore

SocialMedia411 / Social Media Insider

socialmention

slqotd / SLQOTD

TiffanyStrobel / Tiffany Strobel

socialmediaclub / Social Media Club

Open Source related :

ranginui / Chris Cormack- Koha

joetho / Joe Tho- Koha

wizzyrea / Liz Rea- Koha

Miromurr / Thomas Brevik- Koha

gmcharlt / Galen – Koha

magnusenger – Koha

corephp / ‘corePHP’

nirak / Karin Dalziel- Linux

LinuxVoices

galaxiecruzin / Alex B- Linux

nengard / Nicole Engard – Koha

linuxjournal

Linux

Companies or  Web Sites:

momentile / Momentile

wefollow

engadget / Engadget

google / A Googler

Twitter_Tips / Tips, Tools, Status

facebook / Facebook

nytimes / The New York Times

TwistenFM / Twisten.FM

WebReference

firefox / Firefox

BreakingNewz / Breaking News

Grooveshark

TalkShoe

wordpress / WordPress

BreakingNews / BNO News

google_us_news / Google News US

bbctech / BBC Technology

cnnbrk / CNN Breaking News

Calling All Trainers

Great presenter, friend  and all around fantastic trainer needs your help!  Lori Reed, Employee Learning & Development Coordinator for the Public Library of Charlotte & Mecklenburg County, is calling all trainers, training coordinators, HR managers, directors, consultants, anyone who supports the training and learning function within libraries.

Take a moment to fill out her quick survey.

We both thank you in advance!

Community Partnerships – We Are All In This Together

103_0474Building Community Partnerships: 25 ideas in 40 minutes given by Kathy Dempsey, Editor of Marketing Library Services Newsletter. 2nd live blog attempt so pardon the spelling and grammatical errors.

what makes sense for public may not make sense for government, special – pick what will work for your particular library needs

don’t rely on just money alone – trade for inkind services

join local chamber of commerce, lion’s club, make contact – someone who knows you is less likely to slash your budget

partner with grocery stores – story times love it – book drops – open small branches in the grocery store – not an extra trip to go to the library – they need food

annual book sale at local mall – empty stores gave them spaces for the books

mall was happy because it brought more shoppers in

find groups that are in similar situation – other groups – historical society – what you do someone else is doing it – partner instead of compete

are you targeting support staff? assist to dean? when they need info for bosses they come to you and have some influence with those hire up – same with county commissioners – they are looking to do better work for their bosses

trade deals with small business – local flower shop in kind donations – flowers w/publicity – it is small but building a relationship with another person and business

IT experts – they are busy – want to run ideas or bounce off ideas – or maybe trade some services for personal or library’s needs – do work for you exchange research for them

college professors – even if not academic library – assign class projects that are work for the library – need a new logo – or branding campaign, – helps the teachers as well – helps them not give the same thing year after year – gives the student a real world assignment

scout troups – boy/girls – work to do for badges, build bookshelves, garden, physical tasks that could become an assignment for a group like that – takes heat off troup leader to come up with it all

form alliances with video game stores – grab teens, see what you can trade – give kids credit or coupons – for X number of books they read in Summer Reading Game, gives you more street cred, gaming club at schools – partner with the ones already in the schools – helps both you and the other gaming club to not be afraid you are working togethr ( you may have more space – meeting rooms)

trade training with other trainers – in between conferences do something more local – don’t over look your local experts – anyone who has skills that your staff or customers want – trade inkind – don’t be afraid to ask to trade services

meetings with liaisons w/government officials – get to know the staff members – gives you and in for the legislators – they will ask their aide , put a human face on the library a lot of what partnerships are about

AARP need a lot of information – go to trusted sources – become a trusted source – let local AARP to have meetings in libraries – get on their agenda to help promote yourselves, they think of other groups first – get in there and make sure they think of libraries as well

Choose your influencers – your message will get spread easier

have conversation with them – ask them first

Senior Citizen centers ask them for something in return – volunteers, to do storytimes, help other people, do inventory, writing grant applications

Getting involved w/local politics and staff members – as regular citizen join political action groups, even just the city planners, they have a lot to say about your budget – get to know you as a real person not just a building – never under estimate the power of personal relationships

offering research services to government officials – roads, new intersections – if you know what is going on in the community – offer your services for traffic accidents stats for ___ to help you write your plan

Make alliance with everyone in the community – want to join and do something that matters – don’t always have thousands of dollars but even just 10 will help, sponsor trees (like the angel trees at Christmas) – spell it out for them make it easier

birthday party – book plate – donated then story time around that story – got to feel special – for just $10 that would live in the library for the future

Reporters – they need happy stories – ESPECIALLY NOW – local reporters know you are available not just your press releases – need a quick last min. picture – senior at computer, kid happy w/book, it fills space and put some happiness into the news, offer to write columns about what is going on at the library – you can do research for them too (reporter on deadline – fact checking)

causal advisory boards – get buy ins, best way to make programs/classes instead of guessing is talk to them – never any reason to guess – ask them – don’t make it a formal advisory board – drop ins – you want us to do something for you – what is it? what are the best hours, what interests you? then let them go out into the community they (libraries) are here to serve us – feel ownership and personal relationship with you – parent story time adv. board – what time is best? what craft? do you want to be parental advisor for story time – doesn’t have to be staff time let them work with you (may know other parents and draw in others) building advocates and saving money on glue!

SOCIAL NETWORKS – David Lee King’s blog post – who should you friend and why should you friend others than just other libraries – how to friend people on Facebook – don’t just toss it out there – give them a reason to join you – have a reason to have a page

Parents – are partners – not just sit here for an hour after school – tell them what you have and what the library can be to them as a family or to their children – education

tell as many people the most basic things – what you think they already know – they have no idea

building alliances with k-12 – talk to school teachers, what are the kids working on, what are their plans for the fall- what can we do to help them? conversation – more recognition, align w/education – makes a difference. Howard County Library is considered part of the education budget because our Executive Director and CEO Valerie J. Gross firmly believes that what we do is education and just as important as what the schools do. By aligning ourselves with the schools we have a different budget and more respect in the community.

Consultants – reciprocal relationships where you work for each other – they need information

Approach people – don’t ask like your asking for a favor – we are as valuable as any business out there – start with someone you know or comfortable with – if you know someone from other events start there – role play with colleagues to get comfortable – have a starting line in mind – be the human face of the library – spoof official sponsorships everyone has an “official sponsor” these days – talk to people all the time – on trains, in lines – have some documented facts in your back pocket – use the facts that have already been gathered for you – start at the end and build backwards – what do you want the outcome to be.

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